Tag Archives: psychology

An Unquiet Mind by Kay Redfield Jamison

Cover via Goodreads.

Cover via Goodreads.

Rating: 5/5 stars.

In her bold autobiography An Unquiet Mind, Kay Redfield Jamison details her struggle with bipolar disorder in the midst of her career as a clinical psychologist. First published in 1994, this book highlights Jamison’s bravery: with such a prestigious academic position and a CV full of work related to manic-depressive disorder, she risked her reputation and her ethos by writing this wonderful, heart-wrenching volume. Continue reading

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Gossip: Good for the Soul, Believe It or Not

As someone who was bullied in middle school, just like everyone else was bullied in middle school I understand how hurtful other humans’ words can be. Still, we all talk about other people. We discuss our favorite literary characters on Goodreads, we analyze our beloved television and movie protagonists on Tumblr, and we hear parents converse about their children all the time. But talking about your peers or other people in general brings benefits, even though society tells us otherwise. The rewards of gossip depend on the gossipers’ intent, and if done for the right reasons, it can help out several people.

This selfie from a few months ago captures how I feel about middle school. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times... just kidding, it was only the worst of times.

This selfie from a few months ago captures how I feel about middle school. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times… just kidding, it was only the worst of times.

Continue reading

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Off the Beaten Path

A few months ago, one of my good friends from high school told me she was pregnant. The life path of the contemporary young adult flashed in my mind: go to high school, get a degree, go to college, get a degree, then get more degrees or get a job. Even though I think my friends and I were supportive of her, there were underlying recommendations of an abortion or an adoption. Some of us, I suppose, wondered whether she could continue her current trajectory as a college student with this child on its way.

After a couple of weeks, she decided to keep the baby. Continue reading

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Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes

Cover via Goodreads.

Cover via Goodreads.

Rating: 4/5 stars.

How strange it is that people of honest feelings and sensibility, who would not take advantage of a man born without arms or legs or eyes – how such people think nothing of abusing a man born with low intelligence. It infuriated me to remember that not too long ago I – like this boy – had foolishly played the clown.

And I had almost forgotten.

It’s been a long time since a book has sucker punched me in the stomach both intellectually and emotionally. Continue reading

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Hookup Culture and the Myth of Casual Sex (College Post #5)

As a rising college sophomore, I have witnessed my fair share of sexual relationships that for once were not fictional. Contrary to popular belief, I do not think anyone can isolate sex as a physical activity free of emotional implication. I am not saying that sex is bad, that empowerment through sex is phony, or that people who have a lot of sex should be condemned. Rather, I argue that sex is a complex subject that people should think about, because it has so many intricacies and ramifications for those involved.

Even Katy Perry's seemingly innocent "Birthday" is filled with sexual innuendos. Speaking of birthdays, mine is this Sunday... so you should read and comment on this post as a gift. :)

Even Katy Perry’s seemingly innocent “Birthday” is filled with sexual innuendos. Speaking of birthdays, mine is this Sunday… so you should read and comment on this post as a gift. Just kidding. Sort of.

Sex is almost never just sex. Continue reading

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Life Without Goals

I didn’t feel so well the other day. With ten minutes before class, I placed all of my books in my backpack, turned off the light switch in my dorm room, and slid my fingers across the door handle. A slight breeze from the AC unit made me shiver, a sign of sin to come. After a second of deliberation, I dropped my hand by my side.

Then, I skipped class. Continue reading

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Why Do We Have Friends?

As someone who possesses a natural suspicion toward human beings, I tend to befriend only a few. With my college years coming to a close – well, with three and a half years left, but – and my already non-existent social life fading away, I’ve caught myself contemplating this question: why do I have friends? Why do I hang out with the people I hang out with? Is friendship intrinsically selfish? Why would others even consider associating with me when I make weird animal noises and overuse the words “pulchritudinous” and “twerk”? Continue reading

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Stress Me In

I love my college. The people act with consideration and compassion, the academics keep my mind alive, and the opportunities available continue to amaze me. But all of this – the social life, the challenging schoolwork, the myriad of commitments – comes with a cost: stress. Continue reading

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How Children Succeed by Paul Tough

Cover via Goodreads.

Cover via Goodreads.

Rating: 5/5 stars.

As someone possibly striving to become a teacher, I appreciated How Children Succeed. Paul Tough variegates his writing style enough to keep the book entertaining without losing track of the message he puts forth – one way he does this is by including various anecdotes. He does not just share stories about kids who have suffered in the current education system, but he reveals parts of his own journey, such as when he dropped out of Columbia University.

Tough connects these tales to psychology too, by examining several pertinent ideas like character, conscientiousness, and what it truly takes to succeed in an academic environment. Continue reading

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Stone Him to Death, They Shout

Took me about fifteen minutes to blur and upload this screenshot. Technology is not my strong point...

It took me fifteen minutes to blur and upload this screenshot. Technology is not my strong point…

I took the above screenshot about three weeks ago, from a Facebook thread about suspects of the Boston bombing. The irony strikes because the comment was not directed toward the actual bomber, and thus this person’s violent sentiment was wasted (as well as the support he/she got from five other people). However, it does serve its purpose in allowing me to smoothly transition into my oh so subtle argument against a practice we all know and love: the death penalty.

We all get emotional sometimes. Continue reading

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